confused health and nutrition claims in food marketing to children could adversely affect food choice and increase risk of obesity

by:YABO     2019-12-09
Abstract objective to investigate the nutritional quality of food sold to children in the UK and to explore the use of health and nutrition claims.
Design this intersection.
Segmentation studies were conducted in a wide range of food retailers in the UK.
Products sold to children over the age of 1 with a range of child-friendly themes (i. e.
Cartoons, toys and Promotions)
, And terms that imply nutrition or health attributes, such as \"one of 5\"a-
On the same day, product packaging was found in the store and on the Internet.
Information was recorded about sugar, salt and fat content, and health and nutrition claims.
Ofcom nutrient spectrum model (NPM)
Used to assess the health of the product.
Results 330-
Cereal for breakfast, fruit snacks-
A sample survey of beverages, dairy products and ready-to-eat foods was conducted.
The use of cartoon characters (91. 6%)
Claim of nutrition (41. 6%)
Health statement (19. 6%)
It is a common marketing skill. The one of 5-a-
Daily claims are also common (41. 6%), but 75. 4% (103)
The products that made this claim consist of less than 80 grams of fruit and vegetables. Sugar content (
Mean ± sd for every 100g)
High amount of fruit snacks (48. 4±16. 2u2009g), cereal bars (28. 9±7. 5u2009g)and cereals (22. 9±8. 0u2009g). Overall, 41.
According to Ofcom NPM, 0% of the products are classified as not very healthy.
Conclusion a large part of the products sold to children through product packaging are unhealthy, and the statement used on product packaging is confusing.
Unified guidance can avoid confusion about the nutritional quality of many popular foods.
Objective to investigate the nutritional quality of food sold to children in the UK and to explore the use of health and nutrition claims.
Design this intersection.
Segmentation studies were conducted in a wide range of food retailers in the UK.
Products sold to children over the age of 1 with a range of child-friendly themes (i. e.
Cartoons, toys and Promotions)
, And terms that imply nutrition or health attributes, such as \"one of 5\"a-
On the same day, product packaging was found in the store and on the Internet.
Information was recorded about sugar, salt and fat content, and health and nutrition claims.
Ofcom nutrient spectrum model (NPM)
Used to assess the health of the product.
Results 330-
Cereal for breakfast, fruit snacks-
A sample survey of beverages, dairy products and ready-to-eat foods was conducted.
The use of cartoon characters (91. 6%)
Claim of nutrition (41. 6%)
Health statement (19. 6%)
It is a common marketing skill. The one of 5-a-
Daily claims are also common (41. 6%), but 75. 4% (103)
The products that made this claim consist of less than 80 grams of fruit and vegetables. Sugar content (
Mean ± sd for every 100g)
High amount of fruit snacks (48. 4±16. 2u2009g), cereal bars (28. 9±7. 5u2009g)and cereals (22. 9±8. 0u2009g). Overall, 41.
According to Ofcom NPM, 0% of the products are classified as not very healthy.
Conclusion a large part of the products sold to children through product packaging are unhealthy, and the statement used on product packaging is confusing.
Unified guidance can avoid confusion about the nutritional quality of many popular foods.
ALG conceived and designed this study, supervised data collection, contributing to data analysis and writing
Is the guarantor of the whole study. GM-
The United States contributed to data collection, data entry and manuscript writing.
AP contributed to manuscript writing.
ANM contributed to data entry and analysis and drafted the manuscript.
Funding authors have not announced specific funding for this study from any public, commercial or non-commercial funding agency --for-profit sectors.
No one declared a competitive interest.
Uncommissioned source and peer review;
External peer review.
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