How my mother filled her empty nest with African violetsHow my mother filled her empty nest with African violetsHow my mother filled her empty nest with African violets

by:YABO     2020-01-29
Since I remember my mother likes to plant plants, there are always two or three large trees in the corner of the living room, such as Norfolk pine and ponytail palms, and some small ones, such as Geranium on the windowsill.
Everything works together.
Our little apartment, the furniture and plants here and there
Until 10 years ago, my brother left home to study and live abroad.
Then my mother began to plant African Violet crazily.
She bought some colors, sizes, and leaf shapes that are different, and then breed new ones from the leaves of existing plants.
Soon, all the windowsills were filled with African violet.
She changed the layout of the living room furniture and made more space for her plants.
No one has ever been allowed to pull or push the curtains since --
This is her exclusive mission.
She even sets the home temperature according to the needs of the plant.
On one occasion, she decided to put up a shelf in front of the window in the living room to take advantage of the sun and had enough space to grow more and more African violet.
She created a nursery.
The new leaves in the water are in the upper right corner, the newly planted leaves in the soil are in the upper left corner, and the strong old leaves are at the bottom of the shelf.
I think in brilliant days there are 100 or more African Violet cans on these shelves.
Relatives and friends asked my mother for African violet, but she always refused to give it.
Everyone who knows her admits that she is a very generous woman, but when it comes to her African Violet, she is not.
Some people are really frustrated and even say, \"you have too many plants, what happens if you give me one?
\"They are like my children.
\"I can\'t give them away,\" My mother said . \".
If that person is so fond of her, she will give her a leaf and patiently explain how to breed new plants.
But after a few months they mostly came back with the same complaint: \"The result is not like yours.
What is the secret? \"\"Secret?
None.
Just take care of them. \"She said.
But there\'s a secret.
My mother filled the void left by my brother with grown African violet.
She poured her love for him on her plants.
After my brother, I also decided to go abroad for education.
I have been away from home for two years and when I went back I met all kinds of cactus at home.
The windowsill of my room was full of small cactus of different shapes and sizes. \"Really?
Did you choose Cactus for me?
I made fun of my mom.
\"Wait and see how they bloom,\" she said . \".
She\'s right.
I can\'t compare the beauty of the blooming cactus to any other plant --
Maybe it\'s because you don\'t want these harsh plants to have tiny, delicate and colorful flowers.
I immigrated to Canada five years ago.
I haven\'t been home since then, and I haven\'t imagined my mother\'s plants over the years until she recently sent me some photos.
I was shocked to see plants on every corner, every corner and every table.
Her living room has become an urban jungle.
My mother never complained about her loneliness.
She never said she missed me or asked me to come home and visit her.
I always complain about the difficulty of immigration.
Immigration is my own decision, but I know it affects her life as much as I do.
In recent years, she has planted so many plants in the apartment to fill the gaps left by the children.
African violet and cactus are not enough, so she adds more and more other plants.
I can\'t imagine how much more she will grow, which makes me very sad.
Mothers all over the world want their children to be happy and safe, even if it means they stay away from them for the rest of their lives.
Some people, like my mother, respect the choice of their children, some are on duty and serve their country, not only for their children, but also for a better life for all children.
Moreover, some people are forced to separate from their children for race, religion, nationality and other absurd reasons.
This Mother\'s Day, let us remember those mothers who are far away from their beloved children, those who have made heroic sacrifices to let their children pursue their dreams and be happy and safe.
Mary am Rafiee is an immigrant writer living in kidina.
Her book is: Dear father: tell a story through a letter.
Mary am Rafiee is an immigrant writer living in kidina.
Her book is: \"Dear Dad: The story told by letter.
\"Since I remember my mother likes to plant plants, there are always two or three large trees in the corner of the living room, like Norfolk pine and ponytail palms, and some small ones like geranium on the windowsill
Everything works together.
Our little apartment, the furniture and plants here and there
Until 10 years ago, my brother left home to study and live abroad.
Then my mother began to plant African Violet crazily.
She bought some colors, sizes, and leaf shapes that are different, and then breed new ones from the leaves of existing plants.
Soon, all the windowsills were filled with African violet.
She changed the layout of the living room furniture and made more space for her plants.
No one has ever been allowed to pull or push the curtains since --
This is her exclusive mission.
She even sets the home temperature according to the needs of the plant.
On one occasion, she decided to put up a shelf in front of the window in the living room to take advantage of the sun and had enough space to grow more and more African violet.
She created a nursery.
The new leaves in the water are in the upper right corner, the newly planted leaves in the soil are in the upper left corner, and the strong old leaves are at the bottom of the shelf.
I think in brilliant days there are 100 or more African Violet cans on these shelves.
Relatives and friends asked my mother for African violet, but she always refused to give it.
Everyone who knows her admits that she is a very generous woman, but when it comes to her African Violet, she is not.
Some people are really frustrated and even say, \"you have too many plants, what happens if you give me one?
\"They are like my children.
\"I can\'t give them away,\" My mother said . \".
If that person is so fond of her, she will give her a leaf and patiently explain how to breed new plants.
But after a few months they mostly came back with the same complaint: \"The result is not like yours.
What is the secret? \"\"Secret?
None.
Just take care of them. \"She said.
But there\'s a secret.
My mother filled the void left by my brother with grown African violet.
She poured her love for him on her plants.
After my brother, I also decided to go abroad for education.
I have been away from home for two years and when I went back I met all kinds of cactus at home.
The windowsill of my room was full of small cactus of different shapes and sizes. \"Really?
Did you choose Cactus for me?
I made fun of my mom.
\"Wait and see how they bloom,\" she said . \".
She\'s right.
I can\'t compare the beauty of the blooming cactus to any other plant --
Maybe it\'s because you don\'t want these harsh plants to have tiny, delicate and colorful flowers.
I immigrated to Canada five years ago.
I haven\'t been home since then, and I haven\'t imagined my mother\'s plants over the years until she recently sent me some photos.
I was shocked to see plants on every corner, every corner and every table.
Her living room has become an urban jungle.
My mother never complained about her loneliness.
She never said she missed me or asked me to come home and visit her.
I always complain about the difficulty of immigration.
Immigration is my own decision, but I know it affects her life as much as I do.
In recent years, she has planted so many plants in the apartment to fill the gaps left by the children.
African violet and cactus are not enough, so she adds more and more other plants.
I can\'t imagine how much more she will grow, which makes me very sad.
Mothers all over the world want their children to be happy and safe, even if it means they stay away from them for the rest of their lives.
Some people, like my mother, respect the choice of their children, some are on duty and serve their country, not only for their children, but also for a better life for all children.
Moreover, some people are forced to separate from their children for race, religion, nationality and other absurd reasons.
This Mother\'s Day, let us remember those mothers who are far away from their beloved children, those who have made heroic sacrifices to let their children pursue their dreams and be happy and safe.
Mary am Rafiee is an immigrant writer living in kidina.
Her book is: Dear father: tell a story through a letter.
Mary am Rafiee is an immigrant writer living in kidina.
Her book is: \"Dear Dad: The story told by letter.
\"Since I remember my mother likes to plant plants, there are always two or three large trees in the corner of the living room, like Norfolk pine and ponytail palms, and some small ones like geranium on the windowsill
Everything works together.
Our little apartment, the furniture and plants here and there
Until 10 years ago, my brother left home to study and live abroad.
Then my mother began to plant African Violet crazily.
She bought some colors, sizes, and leaf shapes that are different, and then breed new ones from the leaves of existing plants.
Soon, all the windowsills were filled with African violet.
She changed the layout of the living room furniture and made more space for her plants.
No one has ever been allowed to pull or push the curtains since --
This is her exclusive mission.
She even sets the home temperature according to the needs of the plant.
On one occasion, she decided to put up a shelf in front of the window in the living room to take advantage of the sun and had enough space to grow more and more African violet.
She created a nursery.
The new leaves in the water are in the upper right corner, the newly planted leaves in the soil are in the upper left corner, and the strong old leaves are at the bottom of the shelf.
I think in brilliant days there are 100 or more African Violet cans on these shelves.
Relatives and friends asked my mother for African violet, but she always refused to give it.
Everyone who knows her admits that she is a very generous woman, but when it comes to her African Violet, she is not.
Some people are really frustrated and even say, \"you have too many plants, what happens if you give me one?
\"They are like my children.
\"I can\'t give them away,\" My mother said . \".
If that person is so fond of her, she will give her a leaf and patiently explain how to breed new plants.
But after a few months they mostly came back with the same complaint: \"The result is not like yours.
What is the secret? \"\"Secret?
None.
Just take care of them. \"She said.
But there\'s a secret.
My mother filled the void left by my brother with grown African violet.
She poured her love for him on her plants.
After my brother, I also decided to go abroad for education.
I have been away from home for two years and when I went back I met all kinds of cactus at home.
The windowsill of my room was full of small cactus of different shapes and sizes. \"Really?
Did you choose Cactus for me?
I made fun of my mom.
\"Wait and see how they bloom,\" she said . \".
She\'s right.
I can\'t compare the beauty of the blooming cactus to any other plant --
Maybe it\'s because you don\'t want these harsh plants to have tiny, delicate and colorful flowers.
I immigrated to Canada five years ago.
I haven\'t been home since then, and I haven\'t imagined my mother\'s plants over the years until she recently sent me some photos.
I was shocked to see plants on every corner, every corner and every table.
Her living room has become an urban jungle.
My mother never complained about her loneliness.
She never said she missed me or asked me to come home and visit her.
I always complain about the difficulty of immigration.
Immigration is my own decision, but I know it affects her life as much as I do.
In recent years, she has planted so many plants in the apartment to fill the gaps left by the children.
African violet and cactus are not enough, so she adds more and more other plants.
I can\'t imagine how much more she will grow, which makes me very sad.
Mothers all over the world want their children to be happy and safe, even if it means they stay away from them for the rest of their lives.
Some people, like my mother, respect the choice of their children, some are on duty and serve their country, not only for their children, but also for a better life for all children.
Moreover, some people are forced to separate from their children for race, religion, nationality and other absurd reasons.
This Mother\'s Day, let us remember those mothers who are far away from their beloved children, those who have made heroic sacrifices to let their children pursue their dreams and be happy and safe.
Mary am Rafiee is an immigrant writer living in kidina.
Her book is: Dear father: tell a story through a letter.
Mary am Rafiee is an immigrant writer living in kidina.
Her book is: \"Dear Dad: The story told by letter.
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